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Most Amazing Updated Comprehensive Truck Crew Bible EVER.


Created by Mira Kapuscinski and Annie DiIenno, 2011













General Job Description:

Truck Crew’s primary purpose is the management and transport of all waste and freight on-island. Waste is any material that has been functionally used up and needs to be removed from the island. Types of waste include but are not limited to; trash, recycling, sludge, compost, yomp, construction debris, and scrap metal. Freight includes any items coming on to the island off a boat or any non-waste that needs to be moved to a new location on the island. Types of freight include but are not limited to; food, linen, lumber, power sources, luggage, and cleaning supplies. Truck crew is also is responsible for the cleanliness of several specific areas. See details within.

The Truck Crew Supervisor has reported to several different authorities and has been in a few different departments. Recently it was added to the Marine Services department, which fits well as it is part of a transportation based operation. The Truck Crew supervisor reported to the Logistics Coordinator in 2011. Depending on the various positions that exist and are changed around during the years, the truck crew supervisor may be able to take on more or less responsibility. Ideally, the truck crew supervisor is able to take on some advanced planning and be in charge of planning various special projects. Having a set schedule and comprehensive bible should enable Truck Crew to be more self-sufficient and to rely on management less.

Staffing: Truck Crew has operated with various levels of staff depending on whether or not they were responsible for grounds and deckhanding. In the past few years, grounds and deckhanding have been delegated to their own crews, which means that the number of truckies has decreased substantially. Furthermore, due to the increased use of machinery such as the backhoe and the crane, the amount of manual labor necessary has decreased dramatically. A four person truck crew is more than enough to get rounds, deliveries, and special projects done on slow days, without the help of Rounders of Volunteers. Rounders or Volunteers can be used if more than one person on the crew wants to take the same day off, or if you have a big project in mind, but otherwise, a 4 person crew, or 3 people when one is on day off, should be more than sufficient.

Trash and Recycling: Truck crew must collect trash and recycling from various locations around the Island at least once a day. The past few years rounds have been done in the morning, in various ways depending on the size of the crew. For the past three consecutive seasons, truck crew has been a four person crew, meaning that the management of trash in the mornings (trash rounds) is best to be split up in to 3 areas (accounting for one person on day off). Those areas are: -Kitchen/Underworld -Truck Trestle (Recycling & Trash) -OBR (Recycling) -Pel Hall (Trash) -OLR (Trash) -Underworld Bathrooms (Trash) -Swett Ave near Snack Bar (Trash & recycling) -Kitchen (3 trash) -Pots Room (1 Trash, 1 Recycling) -Dish Room (trash) -Bakery (trash) -Tower/Front Porch -2nd, 3rd, and 4th floor Oceanic, right outside the stairs -Front Porch (4 trash, 2 recyling) -Perimeter/Stone Village (should be done by 2 people if a large conference) -Pier (2 trash, 2 recyling) -Brookfield (Trash & Recyling) -Cottage D (Trash, recycling, paper recycling) -Linquist Deck (Trash & recycling) -Newton (2 Trash & 2 recycling) – can be less with smaller conferences -Marshman (1 trash, 1 recycling) – may be one more trashcan inside

Trash from the underworld, tower, and front porch can be thrown directly onto Gunther in the parking lot, except for on days when there are trash runs, in which case they can be thrown directly into Zeke. Trash from the kitchen can be brought to the kitchen loading dock. Trash from the Perimeter can either be picked up by Dante, making a round around the island and meeting Gunther at the kitchen loading dock or can be left out next to the road for Gunther to pick up as he goes around the island, in the event that Dante is not working. Ideally, trash is not left out along the road as it looks bad and seagulls will rip the bags open. Walk trash whenever possible to the back kitchen loading dock. On days when there is not a trash run, trash and recycling should get brought to the dump and stored in the bins, in an organized fashion – trash/debris/demo bags and recycling/cardboard. Heavy recycling (glass bottles, etc) should be put directly into recycling totes to reduce the amounts of gross waste that the rats can get to. On days when there is a trash run, trash and light recycling should be removed from the bins and put into Zeke, where it is staged for the afternoon trash run. In the event of rain trash remains in the back of Gunther so that food can be put into Zeke, in which case Zeke will be driven to the parking lot after food line so that food can go up the Caswell staircase. Some kind of system of signage needs to be developed to ensure proper disposal of waste. We are charged by volume rather than mass four our recycling, so crushing cans and plastic saves us money, strongly encourage the Pelican population at large to crush their cans. In 2011 the deckhands started sorting recycling and crushing cans, but this is a responsibility that has fallen to Truck Crew in the past and there is no reason it shouldn’t be their responsibility again. During a trash run, Zeke should be backed up to the end of the pier and trash should be craned onto the boat using bagsters. Bags that are ripped should be rebagged in order to make offloading in town easier.

Sludge: Sludge is the by-product of our waste treatment process. We move sludge in 10 gallon buckets and send it in as often as needed, usually every other week. Sludge buckets will be prepped by the WTF and left easily accessible. It should be remembered that any run sent in with sludge will return with empty buckets that will need to be brought back to the WTF. Sludge buckets become unwieldy if they are over loaded. At the beginning of the season it is helpful to have folks from the WTF go in on a sludge run so that they understand the entire process and don’t overload the buckets. You should wear gloves while handling sludge buckets.

Compost: Compost is mostly produced by the kitchen and is only raw vegetables, eggshells, coffee grounds, and tea bags. Full cans should be collected each day with trash and brought to the dump for the WTF to process. Empties should be brought to the yomp deck. Containers are the smaller totes marked ‘compost’. It is important that there is not a large volume of paper products in these containers as our composting system is not capable of handling this.

Yomp: Yomp is all of the other food waste that is created on Star. This is collected in green biodegradable bags and brought from the kitchen, dish room, and Pel Hall to the yomp deck and placed in the large black totes labeled ‘yomp’. These should be picked up first thing in the morning and brought directly to the pier where the deckhands will load them onto the morning boat. It is extremely important that these totes are filled no more than a third of the way full as they become very heavy. If necessary, pull out some bags and even out the volume inside each tote. Make sure there are 2 totes accessible at all times, as the kitchen will take the easy way out if one of them is blocked and fill it all the way up. It is important to remember that we get all of the yomp totes from the yomp deck and from the dump down to the boat every single morning so that it doesn’t build up.

Construction Debris: Bulk trash includes anything large and bulky (mattresses, building debris) or that has an excessive volume (shingles from roofing). Bulk trash occasionally must be stored for a period of time before it can be disposed of. It is important to stress that anyone who will be creating bulk trash notify the Logistics Coordinator well in advance to insure that a plan for disposal can be established. Keeping bulk trash dry will save large amounts of aggravation in the long run.

Scrap Metal: Ideally should be brought to a designated area at the dump and disposed of when a large amount of it accumulates. Coordinate with the logistics coordinator.

Trash and recycling leave the island three times a week and are loaded with the use of the pier crane. Before the arrival of the freight boat 1 truck should be loaded with all of the trash leaving that day, our dumpster in town is 10 cubic yards and should be maximized as often as possible. Trash should be staged in large green bagsters to one side of the pier within reach of the crane. Recycling totes should be brought to the pier and go on the boat after trash has been loaded.

Freight: The most common type of freight will be the thrice weekly food run. This run will bring 2-3,000 pounds of food and supplies and needs to be accomplished quickly and efficiently. The rack body truck should be utilized for food runs, because large pallets of food can be craned directly onto the truck saving enormous amounts of energy. These pallets and containers of frozen food are then brought to the kitchen loading dock and brought to their destination with the cooperation of the Kitchies using hand-carts. Dante can fit 2 pallets (or the coolers) inside his bed with the tailgate closed. Gunther can hold 6 pallets (or coolors).

Boats other than the food run always have the potential for freight. Frequent conversations between Truck Crew and the Logistics Coordinator will allow for planning ahead for any non-standard freight.

Freight can also include items that need to be move from point A to point B and are to heavy/numerous for a garden cart. Truck crew will typically be contacted by the staff member who is requesting the move. The need for these movements can usually be planned ahead for and should not come in as emergency need to be done now situations.

Crane Operational Procedure: Need 2 people on boat to strap food, then one to hold tagline and one to adjust palleted food if necessary.

One person on pier as button-pusher. This person should also keep an eye on all wires attached to the crane to ensure that they do not get hung up. Always be communicative for safety purposes, i.e. ‘going up’, ‘coming down’. Pay attention to people on the boat and on the truck and listen for instruction.

One person should always be holding the tagline.

Two people on the truck to guide pallet and unpack.

Trucks:

The Star Island trucks are the tools of your trade. These are the able steeds we currently have in our stable, each has its own strengths and weaknesses.

  1. Gunther: A 1997 Isuzu Cab-Over rack body truck with a hydraulic lift gate. Gunther’s strengths are that it can travel over dishie rock and across the back-side (weather dependant), has a lift gate capable of lifting 800 lbs and can have items craned directly onboard. Guthers weakness include a temperamental electrical system and no cover over payload.
  2. Zeke: A 2001 Isuzu Cab-Over box truck. Zeke’s strength are high dependability, protection from rain/wind for payload and better capacity to carry many small items. Zeke is weak in that it should not be driven over dishie rock or the back side of the island and it does not have a lift gate.
  3. Dante: 1997 Chevy Cheyenne 1500 pick-up. Dante is the most nimble of all the trucks and should be utilized for anything not requiring a larger pay-load. Dante can also traverse dishie rock and the back side even in muddy conditions. It however lacks a large pay-load, bed cover and a lift gate.
  4. TLB (Tiny little backhoe): 2006 John Deere TLB 110. This multi-function backhoe requires training beyond that of driving a normal truck, but can make the work much lighter. TLB can be used as a fork lift, front-end loader or excavator. It is important to remember the bucket/forks should never lift more than 3000 lbs. You must be cleared to operate this, usually by the island engineer. Do not take this out without permission.
  5. Vic: 2003 Clubcar golf cart. Used for mobility challenged guests. You can’t use this, don’t ask.
  6. Garden cart. Large wheeled device. Don’t be afraid to use this, no one will think less of you.

Safety is paramount when operating any vehicle on the Island. No one may drive a vehicle on Star Island without being previously trained regarding Island specific driving rules. Each year everyone who is interested in driving a truck must be checked out in advance and sign the truck driving waiver, if they fail to adhere to the rules contained in the waiver their driving privileges will be suspended or revoked.

Change-over: Change-over is a lovely once (or more) time on the Island when everyone gets to do a little truck-like work. During the regular season there is a set change-over schedule that truck crew will follow. This schedule involves gathering bags, getting bags onto a boat, gathering linens, normal daily rounds, unloading bags and bringing them to rooms.

6:30 am- Breakfast 6:50am – Truck crew stages trucks: Gunther at Cottage D, Dante at the Wind Tunnel, and Zeke backed up to the hotel loading dock. 7:00 am- All hands begin collecting bags, trucks to be loaded at loading dock, wind tunnel and cottage D 7:20 am- Load freight boat after all bags have been collected 7:45 am- Freight boat departs Rounds 10-10:15am- 15 minute break Rounds, linens (D, Windtunnel to laundry room in Dante), changeover clean of all areas 12-1pm- Lunch 2:30pm- Bring trucks to pier – jobcom announcements for people to come down to pier on 5 and 6 2:50pm- Unload boat, move trucks to head of pier prior to Thomas Laighton arrival 3:30pm- Conference boat arrives, cheer them on 3:45pm- Continue to deliver bags to rooms if necessary and social hour supplies to Newton

Docking the Laighton: On occasion you may have to dock the Laighton. This should involve getting down to the pier before the Laighton arrives and prepping the crane, generator, and gangplank. Wear a lifejacket. Catch lines as instructed by the Laighton staff. Attach crane to straps on gangplank and go up. Make sure the chain side of the gangplank is closest to the boat. You may have to lift/tilt the stairs to reach the 2nd level of the Laighton, which is where we generally attach the gangplank. Roll the stairs up to the gangplank and wait for the Laighton to attach the chains on the gangplank to the Laighton so that the gangplank is secure. Detach the crane from the gangplank, bring the straps down, and pull the crane off to the side so that the chain is not in the way. Tie off the taglines to the side of the pier and turn off the generator. Reverse steps when sending the Laighton off.

Jobcoms: It can be difficult to hear your jobcom over the noise of the generator/crane/radio/trucks. People will get mad if you don’t answer so do your best.

Notes: Truck crew has a mailbox at the writing desk in the Lobby that should be checked everyday, usually by the person doing trash on the Front Porch.

Lobsters: There is a once a week lobster night during the regular season. Find out when lobsters are coming each week (normally aboard the Uncle Oscar) from the Food Service Manager and make sure someone is available to pick them up. They are frequently delivered late in the afternoon and often everyone has taken off and the dockies are frantically jobcoming for truck crew.

The Dock: The dock can be a stressful part of this job. There are many variables and ample opportunity for injury to you, your crew, or people on and around the dock. Given this the dock must be run with precision and most importantly a voice of authority. I’m not a huge fan of barking commands, but this situation makes it necessary. This is an important interface between transport departments – namely captains/deckhands and truck crew. Communication and efficiency are important for making this operation run smoothly and keeping everyone happy.

When truck crew arrives to dock the boat the end of the pier (usually the domain of the dockie) becomes yours and you become responsible for everything that is going on. All non-line-handlers must be behind the boathouse. Use the dockies for these tasks. They are excellent at crowd control. People catching lines or reaching across to the boat (i.e. connecting water or passing the ramp) must wear a lifejacket.

A few quick words about ISSCO-Star relations. Always follow the Dave Reynolds Credo which is “don’t be a prick”. Introduce yourself to all the captains and tell them if they have any problems to come to you.

Marine Services Relations: The Truck Crew Super, Logistics Coordinator, and Boat Captain rely on each other to maintain smooth operations; it is helpful if you have a good working relationship. Maintaining open lines of communication in terms of advanced planning, day-to-day operations, and problems that may arise is crucial. The three serve as a triumvirate – the logistics coordinator organizes all areas of transport and the captain/deckhands and truck crew super enact these plans off-island, on the boat, and on-island, respectively, with some overlap on the end of the pier.

Some years, the logistics coordinator has been truck crew’s manager – this means that in addition to providing the truck crew supervisor with information on boats and freight, that they have provided additional support, such as providing materials and parts that truck crew needs and information on long term planning and special projects. The Truck Crew Super makes sure the missions are properly staffed, and gives input as to boat times and such to make things run more smoothly. The logistics coordinator serves the boat captains in a similar fashion.

The majority of interaction between captains/deckhands and truck crew occurs at the end of the pier, but everything that these three departments do impact each other. For example, truck crew may not have to deal with trash in-town, but the way that that they process and handle trash on island directly impacts how difficult it is for the captain and deckhands to deal with trash off-island. In past years truck crew has served as deckhands, which created less of a disconnect between the two crews, but in the past few years Star Island has employed permanent deckhands, which makes it crucial that truck crew is even more aware of how they impact these crews, since they almost never experience the in town side directly.

Truck Crew Areas: There are certain areas that truck crew is responsible for maintaining and keeping clean and organized. This has been done in several ways thoughout the years – find a way that works for you and do it! One option is having each crew member responsible for a certain area for the season. This is a way to instill pride, responsibility, ownership, and accountability for individual members. The only possible problem that comes from this is a diffused sense of responsibility and a ‘its-not-my-problem’ attitude. Other options include weekly ‘field day’ type cleanup with the entire crew, or just general day-to-day maintenance. Working with the entire crew to clean up areas instills a sense of responsibility on the entire crew for those areas and can help boost morale and create a ‘hurricane’ type attitude, which is always fun. Areas that should be maintained are: the dump, the parking lot, yomp deck, back kitchen loading dock, cement shed, trucks, under the front porch, and the end of the pier.

The Dump The dump is always a problematic area. There have been movements to keep stuff from accumulating there, but inevitably stuff gets stashed there. Keeping the dump clean(ish) and organized is important however. Behind the scenes tours go through this area and just in general it is good to keep this place from getting too gross. This area is also shared by Wastewater and Grounds, so it can be a joint project. Ways to facilitate this include: dealing with any scrap metal/odd items that get left their ASAP – let the logistics coordinator know if you need to schedule a scrap metal run, keeping totes neat and orderly (plans this year to create an area where they can be stored neatly are in the works), the compost bins need to be covered in some way and to have doors so that they can be more effectively used as non-disgusting trash storage – some kind of organized structure would be useful, a place for scrap metal and scrap wood should be created, the brush pile should be… dealt with somehow.

The Parking Lot The parking lot gets gross sometimes just due to the volume of trash that is being transferred there and also due to people’s tendency to leave things there. Try to keep this area as neat and tidy as possible. Pay special attention to demo bags, bagsters, loose trashcans, and items building up outside of the laundry room. People often think that they can leave trash in truck crews areas and that they will automatically know to pick them up – keep an eye out for such items and ask supervisors to let you know when stuff should be thrown away.

Yomp Dec k The yomp deck is a constant problem because of the overlap here between truck crew and foodservice. I would recommend that truck crew take accountability for this area because food service is too dispersed. It is easier for you to take control of the situation than having to coordinate between the huge waitrae, kitchen, and snack crews. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t make your expectations clear to these crews, it just means that if they screw up, you may have to man up and deal with the situation yourself. Provide an easier way for them to dispose of grease and you will be saving yourself pain and agony later down the road. Give them enough yomp totes and compost bins to put yomp and compost in and you won’t have to transfer bags by hand later. The yomp deck should be scrubbed down once a week with soap and water, usually on changeover. Someone should clean out the compost buckets – either the kitchen or truck crew at least once a week – talk to the foodservice manager about this issue. Generally the deckhands rinse out the yomp totes in town, but make sure that they are doing this, otherwise you should. When a grease barrel gets full, let the logistics coordinator know and put it on a boat to go into town. If you need empty barrels, let the logistics coordinator know.

Back Kitchen Loading Dock A big problem. Foodservice is constantly leaving shit out there and you have to be the one to deal with it. Communicate with the foodservice manager and/or kitchen supervisor to work this problem out. Again, you will probably just have to man up and be accountable for this area since no one else will. Make sure there isn’t anything random hanging out back there, that the compost bins are covered, that there is no trash building up or on top of the green dumpster, deal with broken glass every day by bringing it to the dump and then sending it on trash runs, communicate with the deckhands when you are sending in aerosol totes so that they know to dispose of it properly, make sure cardboard is dealt with in a timely fashion as it tends to accumulate quickly. Sweep if necessary – try to be respectful of the waitrae’s area out there, tensions mount quickly if this area is messed with. Don’t let things build up and block the propane area, even though there is a sign that says ‘do not block’ most people on Star Island cannot read. Keep an eye on whats going on underneath as well – the kitchen tends to leave a mess underneath the porch near the grease trap.

Cement Shed This is another shared area, again, sometimes its just easier to take responsibility for an area instead of passing it on to someone else. Keep bagsters and demo bags organized. Communicate with other crews if they are leaving it a mess. There is very important truck equipment that is kept in this area that should be monitored and kept track of, for example; the giant cross wrench that is the only tool on-island capable of taking the tires off the trucks, the barrel lifters, and the ratchet straps. The pallet jack was kept here previously, but this year it lived on the boat. This space is often used as a storage space for other crews. Monitor the situation and make sure that it isn’t building up.

Trucks This is one of the most important areas to keep clean, stuff tends to accumulate in the trucks quickly because they are truck crews main area. Trash and recycling bags should be kept in an organized fashion, preferably in milk crates in the beds of the trucks, never in the cabs. It is best to designate an area for clothes and raingear. The furniture repair shop has been used as the truck crew office for a few seasons now. This is a great space to meet in the morning and to keep schedules and people’s belongings. All of truck crews areas should be kept clean and tidy and a sense of pride should be instilled with the crew, but the trucks especially are truck crew’s number one resource and should be treated with the upmost respect, love, and care. Leaving the trucks a mess shows a lack of connection to the job and devotion to some of the islands most important equipment. The truck beds should be swept out and sprayed down/scrubbed as necessary. Trucks are our friends. Friends carrying friends carrying trash.

Under the Front Porch: This area NO ONE takes care of and messes accumulate very quickly. When the question is asked, ‘where can I store this shitty thing that I don’t want to deal with?’ the answer is almost always under the front porch. This isn’t really technically your area, but keep an eye out down there and when things start to accumulate, talk to buildings or whoever is making the mess and ask them to help you organize it better or what you can demo. Throwing stuff away is fun! Next to the ladder rack is where truck crew used to compact trash. As of 2011 the compactor was not working. Don Kurlis should be asked to look at this next time he gets on-island and determine whether it can be salvaged or scrapped. The compactor isn’t as necessary now as it has been in the past, and may be more of a pain in the ass at this point because it makes for much heavier trash bags. Just some thoughts.

End of the Pier: Another shared area where responsibility gets diffused. You are frequently down there so if you see dishes or miscellaneous trash while waiting for a boat, be a good island citizen and pick it up. We all know that the dockies are slackers, so you can’t really expect them to be useful. Don’t leave anything on the end of the pier (totes, bagsters, etc.) if you can avoid it. It looks ugly. Make sure that the ‘L’ part of the pier where the gangplank and stairs are kept is tidy. In 2011 we had wiring issues at the end of the pier and had to use a portable generator (Boris) to run the crane (hermionaynay aka naynay). Boris should be kept gassed up and should be covered with a piece of plywood and a tarp when not in use. If the wiring problem isn’t solved soon, a more permanent structure should be built for Boris.

Hours: Truck crew frequently works odd hours. There are late boats, special pickups, and various unplanned events that come up. It is important to keep track of your crews hours and make sure that they are working less than 50 a week, and preferably no more than 45. If you need help keeping hours down, talk to rounders or if it is a systemic problem (you don’t have enough people ever to get the work done) talk to your supervisor. Hours are due to the Island Clerk by 8am Monday morning. They will be mad if this doesn’t happen. In some years to make up for the large amount of hours worked during the week and especially on changeover, Truck Crew has taken Sunday afternoon off and engaged in Sunday Funday. Make sure you talk to your supervisor and get approval for this, but there is no reason that this shouldn’t be able to happen if there aren’t many boats running on Sunday.

Truck Maintenance:

This is an area that could probably use improvement. For instance we probably have a better system for lawn mower maintenance than truck maintenance. So far we just check fluids periodically, sweep out the backs of trucks and clean the cabs of our stuff.

Every summer Robbie T. comes out to give the trucks some love. He’s a former pelican and currently works as a mechanic in San Francisco. He knows a lot and is more than willing to share his knowledge with truck crew. His number is: 510.290.1754. Call him or talk to Dave about him volunteering.

Truck Driving:

Training should be done by someone with previous truck crew experience, however, here is a guide to help you with some particular areas. Truck driving on Star Island is only difficult because of the conditions of the road and strange angles. There are some tips and tricks that can help you.

-Speed Limit: Under no circumstances should the trucks ever be driven over 10mph, but really you never need to go above 5mph, and should keep it below 2mph until you feel comfortable and competent with driving the trucks.

-Use your mirrors!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Always be aware of what’s going on around you.

-When getting used to driving, do a quick walk around the trucks as to notice any obstacles that may be in your way. Not everyone does this, but it can really save your ass if there is something in the way that you weren’t aware of.

-Parking lot – be aware when backing out of the parking lot of the side of the hotel.

-a good spot to turn around in is next to the grave yard but be aware of the horseshoe spikes.

-Backing down the pier: it is useful to pick a point at the end of the pier on the railing that you can see in your mirror and focus on this point to ensure you are backing down in a straight line.

-Gunther and Zeke can be backed up next to each other on the pier very carefully – it is easy to hit the railings.

-when backing up on the pier, the perfect place to stop to be lined up with the gangplank in Gunther and Zeke is when the driver is lined up with the railing on the pier when it changes in height about 6 inches.

-take care in the Wind Tunnel

-when backing up to the kitchen loading dock with food, pull forward up onto Dishie Rock as much as possible, almost until you are hitting the bench, then cut the wheel all the way around and curve down toward the loading dock, avoiding the steep dropoff directly behind you. You may want to get directed by another member of truck crew until this becomes second nature. Only let people on truck crew direct you, and only one person at a time to avoid confusion.

-in the Stone village keep an eye out for buildings and make wide turns. Especially in the off season beware of mud, it is easy to get stuck. Try not to rip up the lawn. Always be conscious of Vaughn when turning the corner from the Stone Village towards T-town.

-There is a rock between the Art Barn and the garden shed that is large and sits right on the edge of the road on the inside of a sharp curve near the Quarry. It is easy to hit and has the potential to rip off the nuts on the side of the wheel. Make a wide turn here.

-There is a rock when turning out of the dump towards EMB that creates a large drop off on the inside of the turn. Try to avoid this as it jolts the entire truck.

-the Cottage D backup is trickier than it looks. Pull forward up towards the Kiddie Barn and on the right hand side as much as is safely possible. Roll down your window and watch your tire - turn it so that the rear of the tire is pointed towards the hose station on the corner of D and bring it as close to the blue pipe as possible without hitting it. Once you have reached the pipe, cut the wheel completely the rest of the way and back up until you are lined up with the fire escape, at which point you can straighten out.

-drive extra slowly around the back of the island. Really slowly. The road shifts a little every year so there isn’t really a trick to this, just take care.

-when backing up to Newton watch your front – be careful not to go up on the rock pile near the Turnstile and Vaughn or you will scrape the front of your bumper. Watch your wheel as your going up over the rocks and go slowly. Once you clear the rocks, turn your wheel so that you are backing up into the space between Newton and Parker. Beware of the tree – we have few enough on island as is. Do not attempt when wet.

-Pulling up to Marshman involves getting up on the grass which is difficult when it is wet as the ridges on the side of the road are too steep to climb without tearing up the lawn, but ultimately this one is just common sense.

-Don’t hit a building, y’all.

-When coming out of the wind tunnel towards the yomp deck people tend to come close to the pine tree outside of the Berry Stairwell. This is a mistake that beginners often make that can turn into a habit. Try to stay wide of this tree while still keeping the truck level and stable. This is also a very steep area. Keep it very slow to keep from ripping the muffler off.

-T-Town is a good place to turn around. Do not attempt to reverse around the carp shop and Engineers as it is a small space and unsafe. Instead, pull up past the Diesel Farm and into T-Town to turn around instead.

-No one should ever be riding outside of the bed of a truck – especially on Dante it is tempting to sit up on the edge of the bed – this is NO! Don’t let your legs dangle out of the back of Zeke either.








Appendix: Truck Crew 2011 Daily Schedule

Monday (6.5-7.5 hours) 8am – Morning Meeting – address daily schedule, concerns, issues, etc.

8:10am – 2 people bring yomp totes to pier with Gunther. Boat crew will load. Others start on rounds in Perimeter & Stone Village. Gunther returns to parking lot and rounds begin in Tower, Kitchen, & Underworld.

Cardboard bundling ensues. Drive to dump when complete. Trash and light bagged recycling into Gunther. Heavy recycling directly into totes. Return home. Throw trash, light recycling, and bagsters into Zeke.

11:30-12:45pm – Lunch

12:45pm – 3 go to pier to meet boat. Setup crane for food. Accept food, unload yomp and recycling totes from boat. If help is needed, deckhand can assist on the pier. 1 or 2 drive truck to back kitchen loading dock with food & yomp totes. 2 or 3 load bagsters onto boat. Recycling totes to dump.

2:30pm – deliveries or misc projects

3:15pm – off

5:50pm – meet boat on pier. Call Captain or deckhand ahead of time if you desire to see how much freight there is. Consider bringing 2 trucks. Stage yomp totes at end of pier for Tues AM

Tuesday (6.5-7.5 hours) 8am – Morning Meeting – address daily schedule, concerns, issues, etc.

*if no propane/sludge run* Rounds, cardboard bundling, dump, heavy recycling into totes, light recycling & trash into bins.

9:20 – meet boat, pickup empty yomp totes from boat

11:30-12:30 – Lunch

Special Projects

3pm – off

5:50pm – meet boat on pier. Call Captain or deckhand ahead of time if you desire to see how much freight there is. Consider bringing 2 trucks.

6:25pm – Dock Thomas Laighton

7:25pm – let Thomas Laighton off

*if propane/sludge run* 8:10am – pickup sludge/gas in Zeke and/or propane in Gunther. If sludge only stage in Zeke and continue with rounds in Gunter until 9:20am – load sludge onto boat. If propane only bundle cardboard until 9:20 if you have time. If both, you’ll probably have just enough time to pickup and load both.

9:20 – meet boat, pickup empty yomp totes from boat, load propane/sludge/gas

Rounds/bundling/dump, heavy recycling into totes, light recycling & trash into bins.

11:30-1pm– Lunch

1pm – continue Rounds if needed, heavy recycling into totes, light recycling & trash into bins.

2:20pm – meet boat, crane off propane, unload sludge, etc.

Off whenever finished offloading propane/sludge

5:50pm – meet boat on pier. Call Captain or deckhand ahead of time if you desire to see how much freight there is. Consider bringing 2 trucks.

6:25pm – Dock Thomas Laighton

7:25pm – let Thomas Laighton off


Wednesday (6.5-7.5 hours) 8am – Morning Meeting – address daily schedule, concerns, issues, etc.

8:10am – 2 people bring yomp totes & recycling totes to pier with Gunther. Boat crew will load. Others start on rounds in Perimeter & Stone Village. Gunther returns to parking lot and rounds begin in Tower, Kitchen, & Underworld.

Cardboard bundling ensues. Drive to dump when complete. Trash and light bagged recycling into Gunther. Heavy recycling directly into totes. Return home. Throw trash, light recycling, and bagsters into Zeke.

11:30-12:45pm – Lunch

12:45pm – 3 go to pier to meet boat. Setup crane for food. Accept food, unload yomp totes from boat. If help is needed, deckhand can assist on the pier. 1 or 2 drive truck to back kitchen loading dock with food & yomp totes. 2 or 3 load bagsters onto boat.

2:30pm – deliveries or misc projects

3:15pm – off

5:50pm – meet boat on pier. Call Captain or deckhand ahead of time if you desire to see how much freight there is. Consider bringing 2 trucks.

Thursday (6.5-7.5 hours) 8am – Morning Meeting – address daily schedule, concerns, issues, etc.

8:10am – 2 people bring yomp totes to pier with Gunther. Boat crew will load. Others start on rounds in Perimeter & Stone Village. Gunther returns to parking lot and rounds begin in Tower, Kitchen, & Underworld.

Rounds/bundling/dump, heavy recycling into totes, light recycling & trash into bins.

11:30-12:30pm – Lunch

12:30pm – Special Projects

3pm – off

5:50pm – meet boat on pier. Call Captain or deckhand ahead of time if you desire to see how much freight there is. Consider bringing 2 trucks. Pickup yomp and recycling totes from boat.

Friday (6.5-7.5 hours) 8am – Morning Meeting – address daily schedule, concerns, issues, etc.

8:10am – 2 people bring yomp totes & recycling totes to pier with Gunther. Boat crew will load. Others start on rounds in Perimeter & Stone Village. Gunther returns to parking lot and rounds begin in Tower, Kitchen, & Underworld.

Cardboard bundling ensues. Drive to dump when complete. Trash and light bagged recycling into Gunther. Heavy recycling directly into totes. Return home. Throw trash, light recycling, and bagsters into Zeke.

11:30-12:45pm – Lunch

12:45pm – 3 go to pier to meet boat. Setup crane for food. Accept food, unload yomp totes from boat. If help is needed, deckhand can assist on the pier. 1 or 2 drive truck to back kitchen loading dock with food & yomp totes. 2 or 3 load bagsters onto boat.

2:30pm – deliveries or misc projects

3:15pm – off

5:50pm – meet boat on pier. Call Captain or deckhand ahead of time if you desire to see how much freight there is. Consider bringing 2 trucks.









*Diesel engines run on kisses. Word. Proud of you.*